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are talking about slavery. we are talking about racial disparities. you know, even the academics don't really believe in these compelling interests from an original point of view. that is not really their focus. so why we have these racial disparities? you know? isn't at all because of slavery? well, last year the federal government cannot let it be known. but they came out with the most recent figures great 72.5% of african americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, 53.3%. white people, still pretty high, 29.1%. for asian people, it is 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of 10, six out of 10, five out of 10 for blacks and american indians and latinos because they are the so-called underrepresented in minority who get racial preferences. and a two out of 10 people are typically have racial problems. not only in terms of education but in terms of crime and whatever social indicators that you want. now, that is the real problem. of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, roger. now we will hear from a
's indistinguishable and date in no way to provide cover for all those moderate who want to do the right being. i don't think said people exist in the republican party. listen, the answer is grover norquist no new tax pledge. that alone would free the republican party to engage in good faith, sensitive negotiations. everybody knows that our taxes are now at an historic low in the contemporary era and they're going to go out sort of naturally. and with the aging of the population, i guarantee you will be somewhere around 22% gdp. wouldn't it be nice if we could acknowledge that and say what's the most bowl, efficient way to structure a tax system, probably progressive consumption tax direct it in ways to accomplish a whole host of object is. as long as you have that pledge to which members signed, it's hopeless. the republican party cannot be a player in any constructive resolution of the problems confronting the country. there is no political space for a third-party to occupy. it's based on a presumption. we have two extreme parties and there's this great center to mobilize and i'm deeply skeptical t
of reporting through the years. i don't want to do a quickie. i don't write my books for the politics of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for columbia come he lived there for years, 1981 until 1985. in chicago for the first time in 1985 until 1989. then off to harvard law school. two more pieces of the book i would like to ask you about. we want to tie the story together. now we are in 1989. where is his father? >> his father died in 1982 in a car accident driving home drunk from a makeshift bar area -- when we were in nairobi, we saw the streets in the area where this took place in it was almost sadly inevitable. >> host: are his grandparents and mothers alive at this point? >> guest: yes, all three are alive. his mother died right before his book comes out. >> host: "dreams from my father" >> guest: yes, "dreams from my father." so she never got to see his political
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3